Arasimowicz fuelcellDANBURY: Fuel Cell Energy [Nasdaq: FCEL] has appointed Jennifer Arasimowicz was promoted to the newly created officer position of Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, reporting directly to the Chief Executive Officer.  Arasimowicz, a licensed attorney in Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts, has responsibility for legal and government affairs. Arasimowicz joined FuelCell Energy in 2012 as Associate Counsel and was promoted to Vice President in 2014.

Prior to FuelCell Energy, Ms. Arasimowicz served as General Counsel of Total Energy Corporation, a New York based diversified energy products and service company providing a broad range of specialized services to utilities and industrial companies.  Previously, she was a partner at Shipman & Goodwin in Hartford, Connecticut chairing the Utility Law Practice Group and began her legal career as an associate at Murtha Cullina.  She earned her Juris Doctor at Boston University School of Law and holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Boston University.

Putterman Photo 11 26 14 3HARTFORD: The Connecticut News Project, publisher of The Connecticut Mirror and its sister websites TrendCT and CT Viewpoints, has named West Hartford resident and communications professional  Bruce Putterman as its new chief executive officer and publisher. The Connecticut Mirror is a nonprofit online news publication covering state and federal government, public policy, and politics.

Ulysses B. Hammond CNP’s board president said. “To be accountable to our mission and audience, this means CNP needs to be agile and cutting edge. Our board was very impressed by Bruce’s leadership skills, record of innovation, business experience, collaborative style, and knowledge of Connecticut. His combination of skills is just what we need to advance our mission.”

Dobbins Maureen hoffmanMaureen J. Dobbins, MBA, Director of Business Development of Hoffman Architects in Hamden, has been voted President-Elect of the Southern Connecticut Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA). Beginning in 2018, Dobbins will serve as President of the organization. BOMA “supports those in the commercial real estate industry through advocacy, leadership, and education.”

2018 will be the 35th anniversary of BOMA. Dobbins is a principal at Hoffman and directs business development, sales, and marketing activities for the firm.

boston red sox hat baseball navy blue m fitted closed back 47 brand cotton blend 447c64a5bb0f3fc19a1a1fc13e54c0fdNEW HAVEN: If Yale students find a reason to protest the 2017 Yale Class Day speaker they may have most of America and God himself, herself[?] to deal with.

Theo Epstein, president of baseball operations for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball and former general manager of the Red Sox, will be this year’s Class Day speaker on Sunday, May 21, during Commencement weekend.

A graduate of Yale College (Class of 1995), Epstein is a former sports reporter and sports editor at the Yale Daily News.cubs hat

As General Manager of the Red Sox he helped deliver the World Series to Boston fans after a wait of 86 years – and he was only 30 at the time.

Apparently either success went to his head, or he was up for another challenge when he joined the Chicago Cubs as president of baseball operations. Cubs fans had loser bragging rights that even surpassed the Red Sox. They hadn’t won a world championship since Roosevelt was president, that’s Theodore Roosevelt.

bellNEW HAVEN: Leonard Bell Co-founded Alexion Pharmaceuticals [Nasdaq: Alxn] in 1992 in a small lab in New Havens’ Science Park  with Stephen Squinto Ph.D.  and David Keiser. Today as Bell announces his retirement as Chairman, [ he retired as CEO in April of 2015] the company has a market capitalization of $29 billion and occupies the signature building in downtown New Haven housing more than 1,000 employees.  Keiser retired as president in 2008 as president and Squinto as Executive VP in 2014.

Dr. Bell's  efforts were first covered in Business New Haven in 1994 and he was recognized as a greater New Haven Healthcare Hero in 2011. Bell said of his departure and the future, “I am incredibly proud of all that we have achieved over the past 25 years, and I have great confidence in the future of the company.. I am very much looking forward to spending increasing time with my family, and also exploring new and different opportunities.”

Alexion drug development has been toward rare diseases, but it still has been among the fastest growing and most successful start ups in Connecticut history. In 2008 when Keiser retired, Alexion had sales of $76 million, 2016 sales were $3.1 billion. As CEO, Bell engineered two major acquisitions in 2015 to diversify the company’s drug pipeline, totalling nearly $10 billion dollars in purchase costs, a gamble on two drugs that had not received final FDA approval.

[see The Future is Suddenly Uncertain and The News is Not Completely Good  ] the drugs Strensiq and Kanuma did receive approvals and while reportedly off to a slow start, are expected to eventually produce sales of more than $1.5 billion.

With a new headquarters, hefty profits, and more than $3 billion in sales, 2016 was to be the best year ever as Bell contemplated his retirement. A controversy and an internal investigation in November, led to questions about financial controls and the resignation of the company’s CEO and CFO.

In response to the allegation and investigations, Alexion stock began to tank and two class action lawsuits were filed.  By early January the company had an interim CEO, David Brennan a board member and former CEO of Pharma giant AstraZeneca  and it satisfied itself no material effect were caused by the shortcomings.

Before founding Alexion, Bell was an attending physician at Yale-New Haven Hospital and assistant professor of Medicine and Pathology at the Yale University School of Medicine. Bell’s current stock ownership of the company has a value of approximately $50 million.

women techConnecticut Technology Council Announces the 2017 Women of Innovation® Finalists and Awards Gala.

HARTFORD:  The Connecticut Technology Council (CTC)  announced the 50 Women of Innovation finalists for its 2017 Women of Innovation awards program.

The finalists  are scientists, researchers, academics, manufacturers, student leaders, drafters, entrepreneurs, and technicians from Connecticut’s business, academic and technology community.  There are eight categories [see below] and the finalists will be recognized and a winner will be announced for each category at the Women of Innovation® Awards Gala at the Aqua Turf Club in Plantsville on March 29 from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

The women tech leaders live and work in cities and towns from across the Nutmeg state, with representatives from Suffield to Greenwich, from Mystic, to Danbury.

WOI 2015 sponsorsA diverse group of twenty companies are represented by the women innovators as well, from Sikorsky in Stratford, to Sonalysts Studios in Waterford and Bioarray Genetics in Farmington.